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Paula Rosa’s Black and White Digital Images of a Surreal Future

Lisbon, Portugal based artist Paula Rosa combines digital painting with photo manipulation to create surreal black and white landscapes. Most incorporate painted areas and photography, all put together in Photoshop CS4, merging technology with visions from Rosa's imagination and dreams. Exploring psychological themes, her landscapes usually portray nudes morphing with their sterile and polluted industrial surroundings.

Lisbon, Portugal based artist Paula Rosa combines digital painting with photo manipulation to create surreal black and white landscapes. Most incorporate painted areas and photography, all put together in Photoshop CS4, merging technology with visions from Rosa’s imagination and dreams. Exploring psychological themes, her landscapes usually portray nudes morphing with their sterile and polluted industrial surroundings. At times, Rosa carves windows into their feet and limbs, revealing scenes from her memories that evoke feelings of despair. “Through my painting, I like to tell timeless stories, in which action develops in different and often absurd tenses,” she says. “The future, as in any unfinished story, is a prominent question mark, being the difference between dystopic and utopic impressions, sometimes, just a matter of perspective.”

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