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Jon Rafman Covers Digital Spaces in Renowned Contemporary Artworks

Canadian multimedia artist Jon Rafman often explores the boundaries between our real lives and our virtual lives. Working primarily in digital media, his works illustrate a modern sense of reality through humour and irony. He is perhaps best known for exhibiting found images from Google Street View, titled "9-Eyes". In his ongoing series "Brand New Paint Job", Rafman re-appropriates famous paintings by contemporary artists into the 3D digital realm.

Canadian multimedia artist Jon Rafman often explores the boundaries between our real lives and our virtual lives. Working primarily in digital media, his works illustrate a modern sense of reality through humour and irony. He is perhaps best known for exhibiting found images from Google Street View, titled “9-Eyes”. In his ongoing series “Brand New Paint Job”, Rafman re-appropriates famous paintings by contemporary artists into the 3D digital realm. Each image features a ready made interior completely covered in works of art by masters Henri Rousseau, Pablo Picasso, Claude Monet, and Roy Lichtenstein, just to name a few. Wrapping around furniture and objects at just the right angle, Rafman uses optical illusion to play with depth and add emphasis to ordinary spaces. His work is currently on view at MAC Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (MACM), his first museum exhibition in Canada, through September 13th.

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