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Italian Artist Sasha Vinci’s Haunting and Carnal Multimedia Works

Sicily, Italy based artist Sasha Vinci creates haunting sculptures and installations that contemplate the nature of man's existence. While his works can be morbid and a bit terrifying, as in his series of fleshy seated subjects waiting for eternity, Vinci also finds beauty and sexuality in the human figure. Known for his captivating and carnal sculptures, Vinci is a true multimedia artist, also exploring drawing, painting, writing, sound design and performance art.

Sicily, Italy based artist Sasha Vinci creates haunting sculptures and installations that contemplate the nature of man’s existence. While his works can be morbid and a bit terrifying, as in his series of fleshy seated subjects waiting for eternity, Vinci also finds beauty and sexuality in the human figure. Known for his captivating and carnal sculptures, Vinci is a true multimedia artist, also exploring drawing, painting, writing, sound design and performance art. Most recently, he also finds inspiration in the absence of the figure and extension of what is human in his 2014 installation “Memento Flori”. Vinci covers objects such as a tv set and empty chairs with purple and white flowers – objects that were once loved and served a purpose now blooming back into life. In his artist statement, he describes his narrative as a free thinking one, focused more on creating an “intimate memory of being, to reach a collection vision and reveal the hardships, the illnesses, the social contradictions of the contemporary world.”

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