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Jeong Woojae Paints the Story of a Girl and Her Giant Dog

Dogs are called man's best friend for a reason. Anyone who owns a dog understands that life long bond. For Seoul, Korea based artist Jeong Woojae, owning a dog also represents a strange combination of needing to satisfy one's insecurities with the newfound comfort it brings. In an ongoing series of whimsical oil paintings, Jeong tells the story of a little girl growing up in Korea with her giant chihuahua. Set against vibrant and hyperrealistic backdrops inspired by the artist's photographs of his hometown, their fairytale life feels very real.

Dogs are called man’s best friend for a reason. Anyone who owns a dog understands that life long bond. For Seoul, Korea based artist Jeong Woojae, owning a dog also represents a strange combination of needing to satisfy one’s insecurities with the newfound comfort it brings. In an ongoing series of whimsical oil paintings, Jeong tells the story of a little girl growing up in Korea with her giant chihuahua. Set against vibrant and hyperrealistic backdrops inspired by the artist’s photographs of his hometown, their fairytale life feels very real. Images of them playing hide and seek and exploring in the park immediately recall famed children’s books Clifford the Big Red Dog, and like “Clifford”, Jeon’s chihuahua is a protector and guardian of his owner. But there is more to this tale than love and companionship. Emotionally speaking, the little girl is a self portrait of the artist, who struggles with anxiety and fears of independence that comes with being an adult. Through his art, Jeong hopes to inspire a sort of rekindling of our relationship with animals and a return to innocence.

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