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Peter Gronquist’s “All of the Above” Explores Familiar Themes in New Ways

Photos by Mik Luxon On July 25th, Hi-Fructose attended the opening of Peter Gronquist's solo exhibition "All of the Above" at Soze Gallery in Los Angeles. As recently discussed, the artist has embarked on more abstract and conceptual explorations than in previous works. For this exhibit, he chose to expand on multiple recurring themes in his art, and techniques using more varied color, form, depth and stillness - and with surprising results. Gronquist's paintings, for example, are created using sanded plexiglass over hand-painted drop boxes, creating a foggy, luminous effect. This process flattens the image to the surface while simultaneously dropping the image back. Gronquist says, "It's hard to explain without seeing in person, I best describe it as a glowing effect."


Photos by Mik Luxon

On July 25th, Hi-Fructose attended the opening of Peter Gronquist’oze solo exhibition “All of the Above” at Soze Gallery in Los Angeles. As recently discussed, the artist has embarked on more abstract and conceptual explorations than in previous works. For this exhibit, he chose to expand on multiple recurring themes in his art, and techniques using more varied color, form, depth and stillness – and with surprising results. Gronquist’s paintings, for example, are created using sanded plexiglass over hand-painted drop boxes, creating a foggy, luminous effect. This process flattens the image to the surface while simultaneously dropping the image back. Gronquist says, “It’s hard to explain without seeing in person, I best describe it as a glowing effect.” Also on display is a new series of captivating infinity mirrors (one of which is also the artist’s favorite piece in the show, a rotating animated zoetrope) inspired by life, death, war, greed and nature. These themes are reflected in his choice of motifs, especially weaponry, tanks and guns that the artist sources from toy stores. For Gronquist, they are also a reminder of the infinite and repetitious nature of all things.

“All of the Above” by Peter Gronquist will be on view at Soze Gallery in Los Angeles through August 25th.

Left to right: Artist Scott Hove, Peter Gronquist, and his cousin, Max Kingery.

Left to right: Artist Sharktoof with Peter Gronquist

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