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Photos of Nightmarish Creatures Made of VHS Tapes by Philip Ob Rey

Throughout human history, stories about wild and elusive giants have been told on almost every continent. Iceland-based French multimedia artist Philip Ob Rey has reimagined such monsters in a photo series of sculptures made of VHS tapes. Rey created "V" HS Project, a set of 5 series of black and white photos and accompanying short films, in contemplation of the future of the human race. Set against the gray skies of Iceland's landscape, the photos portray nightmarish figures wandering a cold and post apocalyptic world.

Throughout human history, stories about wild and elusive giants have been told on almost every continent. Iceland-based French multimedia artist Philip Ob Rey has reimagined such monsters in a photo series of sculptures made of VHS tapes. Rey created “V” HS Project, a set of 5 series of black and white photos and accompanying short films, in contemplation of the future of the human race. Set against the gray skies of Iceland’s landscape, the photos portray nightmarish figures wandering a cold and post apocalyptic world. In the place of fur, they are consumed by mass media; covered in the recycled tapes of our recorded memories which is all that remains of human life on Earth. Rey vividly describes the mythology of this future world in his project’s mission statement: “Where those giants were born, handsome sky-debris make the valleys, nascent forests grow betwixt their knees, forgotten beasts hallucinates the remains of a planet plundered by a snow chemistry… Thus is staged V, vision of a rebirth, of the impure Being according to the ancient Scriptures, creating in the manner of a nihilist prophet a magnified vision of primitive symbols, of holistic elements and exhausted naturalism of the end of a world, and the beginning of another existence.”

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