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Hi-Fructose and Squarespace Present Hyperrealistic Paintings by Kit King

Attention all artists! In partnership with our friends at Squarespace, Hi-Fructose will be highlighting five artists who are currently using Squarespace for their website or portfolio, to be featured on HiFructose.com. This week we are featuring Ontario based artist Kit King, who in collaboration with her husband, creates large scale hyperrealistic oil paintings that portray her subjects in fragments. Her compositions feature tight crops of their faces, eyes, hands, and tattoos with plays on light and shadow to establish mood.  King labels herself as a recluse, and getting up close and personal with her subjects enables her to form personal connections to them.

“Perfectly Weird” by Kit King

Attention all artists! In partnership with our friends at Squarespace, Hi-Fructose will be highlighting five artists who are currently using Squarespace for their website or portfolio, to be featured on HiFructose.com. This week we are featuring Ontario based artist Kit King, who in collaboration with her husband, creates large scale hyperrealistic oil paintings that portray her subjects in fragments. Her compositions feature tight crops of their faces, eyes, hands, and tattoos with plays on light and shadow to establish mood.  King labels herself as a recluse, and getting up close and personal with her subjects enables her to form personal connections to them. “I do not merely want to meticulously capture an image, but rather breathe a vital life force into transformed renditions of the world around me,” she says.

Squarespace is a website publishing platform that makes it easy to create beautiful websites, portfolios, blogs, and online stores without touching a line of code. With easy templates and tools, artist’s can make organized, easy to read and simple to update portfolio sites for art lovers to view all your work in one place.Set up a free trial here and use code HIFRUCTOSE for 10% off your purchase!

Portrait of the artist’s father by Kit King.

Artist Kit King working on her portrait of her father.

Collaboration between Kit King, and her husband Oda.

Collaboration between Kit King, and her husband Oda.

Collaboration between Kit King, and her husband Oda.

Kit King’s husband Oda, with their collaborative painting.

This promotion is underwritten by Squarespace.

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