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Dima Rebus Portrays Urban Life in Unsettling Watercolors

Moscow based artist Dima Rebus paints subdued watercolors of urban life as envisioned by his subjects. Here, life is occupied by situations that are humorous, but also full of uncertainty and fear. In surreal, slightly unsettling scenes, we find young people sleeping in and forgetting their chores while newer works have more serious implications. Titles such as "Life in my city implies heavy consumption of carbohydrates" also imply the artist's reservations and concerns about environmental issues.

Moscow based artist Dima Rebus paints subdued watercolors of urban life as envisioned by his subjects. Here, life is occupied by situations that are humorous, but also full of uncertainty and fear. In surreal, slightly unsettling scenes, we find young people sleeping in and forgetting their chores while newer works have more serious implications. Titles such as “Life in my city implies heavy consumption of carbohydrates” also imply the artist’s reservations and concerns about environmental issues. In this piece, a teenaged girl looks down upon a cold, stark landscape of buildings, barely made out through hazy air. She may be lying on a snow covered rooftop or the white sheets of her bed, but the image is left unclear. Rebus consistently uses negative space in his art which adds to its dreamy quality, giving us room to explore and consider our own apprehensions.

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