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Making of Annie Owens’ “Yee Naaldlooshi (Skinwalker)” Print by Pressure Printing

Hi-Fructose's own Annie Owens just released a new limited edition print of her "Yee Naaldlooshi (Skinwalker)" by Pressure Printing. At their blog, Pressure Printing writes, "When we saw Annie’s Skinwalker watercolor on Instagram almost a year ago, we were entranced. And we weren’t alone – when we re-grammed it it garnered more likes than anything we’d posted before, and still has more likes than anything we’ve posted since. Small wonder: the Navajo witch who can transform into any animal she chooses is a being both evil and mysterious, and Annie’s painting embodies that magic."

Hi-Fructose’s own Annie Owens just released a new limited edition print of her “Yee Naaldlooshi (Skinwalker)” by Pressure Printing. At their blog, Pressure Printing writes, “When we saw Annie’s Skinwalker watercolor on Instagram almost a year ago, we were entranced. And we weren’t alone – when we re-grammed it it garnered more likes than anything we’d posted before, and still has more likes than anything we’ve posted since. Small wonder: the Navajo witch who can transform into any animal she chooses is a being both evil and mysterious, and Annie’s painting embodies that magic.” The original watercolor was first exhibited in Antler Gallery’s “Unnatural Histories III” exhibit last September. Pressure Printing took new steps in their process to capture the original’s soft, flat tones and feathered edges, which was printed in two colors. Take a look at the making of the print below.

“Yee Naaldlooshi (Skinwalker)” by Annie Owens is available now available on pressureprinting.com.

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