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JAZ, Sten & Lex, Augustine Kofie, and More Present New Works in “Cuatro Igual A Uno”

In recent years, Mexico City has played host to some of the most progressive urban artists in the world. Many of them have come together in Celeya Brothers' anniversary exhibition, "Cuatro Igual A Uno": 3TTMan, Christiaan Conradie, Franco Fasoli aka JAZ, Fusca, Augustine Kofie, Lesuperdemon, Sten & Lex, Sanez, Smithe and Jorge Tellaeche. The group represents not only the freshman artists to show with the gallery, but also the city's international draw, hailing from the United States, South Africa, to Argentina. Take a look at more photos from the exhibition after the jump.


Augustine Kofie

In recent years, Mexico City has played host to some of the most progressive urban artists in the world. Many of them have come together in Celeya Brothers’ anniversary exhibition, “Cuatro Igual A Uno”: 3TTMan, Christiaan Conradie, Franco Fasoli aka JAZ, Fusca, Augustine Kofie, Lesuperdemon, Sten & Lex, Sanez, Smithe and Jorge Tellaeche. The group represents not only the freshman artists to show with the gallery, but also the city’s international draw, hailing from the United States, South Africa, to Argentina. Among them is Augustine Kofie, whose 70s-esque colored paintings and murals evoke kitsch with geometrical precision. His new series employs different qualities of line, some futuristic, layered with found images of things like vintage computers and cassette tapes. They communicate a personal language for Kofie, who uses these assemblages to connect the past with the present. Italian duo Sten & Lex have a unique style where line also plays an important role. Their new work mimics the stencils they use to create their murals, which they describe as a combination between geometry, or order, and chaos. Rather than using strips of paper to create their piece, they use black and white to reduce an architectural form to simple halftone-like strokes. JAZ, based in Argentina, shares their boldness in his more politically inspired imagery. His paintings on display depict masked hybrid subjects battling with animals such as the leopard, one that is commonly found in his paintings. Their clashing personifies the power play that exists between modern cultures. Take a look at these and more pieces from “Cuatro Ugal A Uno” below, courtesy of the gallery.


JAZ


JAZ


Fusca


Fusca


Smithe


Stan & Lex


Christiaan Conradie


Augustine Kofie


Augustine Kofie

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