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Douglas “Hoxxoh” Hoekzema Energizes His Murals with Abstract Designs

Miami based street artist Douglas "Hoxxoh" Hoekzema fills his murals with a burst of color and energy using abstract design. While they look like the work of a computer generated graphic, his designs are drawn freely by hand. As if subject to gravity’s pull, geometric circles and triangles radiate from their centers until they take more organic shapes. In his paintings, Hoxxoh often interrupts the design’s infinite nature as if to remind us of its flat dimension. Another way of looking at this interruption is like the stopping of time. Hoxxoh’s main concept, “Time Waits for No Man,” refers to his fascination with the properties of time, both its beauty and society’s obsession with keeping track of it.

Miami based street artist Douglas “Hoxxoh” Hoekzema fills his murals with a burst of color and energy using abstract design. While they look like the work of a computer generated graphic, his designs are drawn freely by hand. As if subject to gravity’s pull, geometric circles and triangles radiate from their centers until they take more organic shapes. In his paintings, Hoxxoh often interrupts the design’s infinite nature as if to remind us of its flat dimension. Another way of looking at this interruption is like the stopping of time. Hoxxoh’s main concept, “Time Waits for No Man,” refers to his fascination with the properties of time, both its beauty and society’s obsession with keeping track of it. Regarding its portrayal, he writes, “Expressing how we can be pulled in one direction, when we are really meant to be going in another. How resistance creates a struggle and a false sense of control. Where if we follow the natural flow of times predetermined, yet unseen path, an experience of beauty and pure form will take shape.” Take a look at Hoxxoh’s latest work below, including his most recent mural at “The Belt” in Detroit, curated by Library Street Art collective.

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