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See-Through Churches by Architecture Duo Gijs Van Vaerenbergh

The shape of a church is indefinitely sketched into the landscape in the latest project by architecture duo, Gijs Van Vaerenbergh. Comprised of Belgian architects Pieterjan Gijs and Arnout Van Vaerenbergh, their series of see-through churches, "Reading Between the Lines," are not intended to be functional as shelter. They are more like sculptures that borrow design inspiration from local churches' architecture in the area. See more after the jump!

The shape of a church is indefinitely sketched into the landscape in the latest project by architecture duo, Gijs Van Vaerenbergh. Comprised of Belgian architects Pieterjan Gijs and Arnout Van Vaerenbergh, their series of see-through churches, “Reading Between the Lines,” are not intended to be functional as shelter. They are more like sculptures that borrow design inspiration from local churches’ architecture in the area. The result is an experimentation with physical space, and depending on your perspective, the churches can be perceived as massive buildings or illusions that are dissolving into their environment. From the interior of the space, the environment is broken up into abstract “lines” which the viewer is encouraged to look through and gain a new outlook on his or her surroundings. Through this visual experience, Gijs Van Vaerenbergh test the definitions of what we consider to be architecture and traditional art.

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