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Christoffer Relander Reveals New Multiple-Exposure Portraits in “Symbiosis”

Finish photographer Christoffer Relander (previously covered here) explores our relationship to nature in his ongoing series of multiple-exposed photographs. Primarily portraits, his dreamy pieces portray subjects physically merging with their natural surroundings. Relander has been working on a new series, "We Are Nature" since 2010, which was revealed on Friday night at Galerie GEO.

Finish photographer Christoffer Relander (previously covered here) explores our relationship to nature in his ongoing series of multiple-exposed photographs. Primarily portraits, his dreamy pieces portray subjects physically merging with their natural surroundings. Relander has been working on a new series, “We Are Nature” since 2010, which was revealed on Friday night at Galerie GEO. On his process, he shares, “As in my previous work I’ve double and triple exposed man and nature in-camera, this time by using a Nikon D800E. Afterwards I’ve imported my RAW-files (yes, you can shoot multiple exposures in RAW-format) to Lightroom to adjust contrast, tones, colours and in some cases adding a small amount of dodging and burning.” In a gray palette with splashes of earthy tones, his pieces follow the color story of nature’s seasons superimposed with the faces of the observer. With the rare exception of Relander’s self portrait, they are meant to be anonymous so that his audience might superimpose themselves into the work.

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