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Janet Echelman Builds Ethereal Aerial Sculpture High Above Boston

Boston based artist Janet Echelmen (previously featured here) has created one of her most dramatic works yet, but you won't find it in any gallery. Her latest aerial sculpture hangs half an acre above Boston's Rose Kennedy Fitzgerald Greenway. Titled "As If It Were Already Here", the piece weighs a whopping 2,000 lbs, made of 542,000 knots which Echelmen wove together into a colorful, graceful mesh. Take a look at more photos after the jump!

Boston based artist Janet Echelmen (previously featured here) has created one of her most dramatic works yet, but you won’t find it in any gallery. Her latest aerial sculpture hangs half an acre above Boston’s Rose Kennedy Fitzgerald Greenway. Titled “As If It Were Already Here”, the piece weighs a whopping 2,000 lbs, made of 542,000 knots which Echelmen wove together into a colorful, graceful mesh. Most often her sculptures are lit at night and cast dramatic shadows that give off an unearthly feeling. The effect of the piece illuminated in the sky and dancing in the wind has been compared to a jellyfish or celestial wormhole. Her work sparks the imagination. This particular work is site-specific; the striped design mimics the now former striped traffic lanes that were removed during Boston’s Big Dig. Three voids in the piece also represent hills that were later raised to create a landfill. As her piece floats over Boston through early October, Echelmen hopes it will inspire people to make these connections between the spaces that surround them.

Greenway Echelman Sculpture – Installation Time-Lapse – 5.3.2015 from Julian Tryba on Vimeo.

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