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Anthony Ausgang’s Trippy Cats Get Trippier in “Catascopes”

Los Angeles based artist Anthony Ausgang, coined a "godfather of Lowbrow," has made a career of depicting his own struggles in his kaleidoscopic cat paintings. Colorful and intensely surreal, his playful images portraying cartoon cats in unusual scenarios are loosely inspired by reality. Ausgang makes no secret of his experimentation with psychedelics, and these experiences have carved their way into his hallucinatory visions and bright palette. In his upcoming solo exhibition "Catascopes", opening May 30th at Copro Gallery, Ausgang's trippy paintings of cats get even trippier.

Los Angeles based artist Anthony Ausgang, coined a “godfather of Lowbrow,” has made a career of depicting his own struggles in his kaleidoscopic cat paintings. Colorful and intensely surreal, his playful images portraying cartoon cats in unusual scenarios are loosely inspired by reality. Ausgang makes no secret of his experimentation with psychedelics, and these experiences have carved their way into his hallucinatory visions and bright palette. In his upcoming solo exhibition “Catascopes”, opening May 30th at Copro Gallery, Ausgang’s trippy paintings of cats get even trippier. Throughout the course of the series, they become completely detached from their already abstract environment. Ausgang plays with the concept of dissolving an image almost beyond recognition, without compromising its impact. His new paintings rely on the visual language of shape, form, color, and line to tell a story, and reproduce an illusion of visible reality. Take a look at our preview of “Catascopes” below.

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