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Moneyless Rearranges His Geometric Works in “Fragmentations”

Italy based street artist Teo Pirisi, known as "Moneyless", is constantly seeking to evolve his already abstract style of work. For his last major solo exhibition (covered here), he sought inspiration in geometrical shapes and patterns. These, he feels, are the fundamentals of life that at their core represent a multitude of possibility. As such, they appear throughout his graffiti writing, painting, drawings and found object installations. For his current exhibition, "Fragmentations," at BC Gallery in Berlin, Moneyless reduces this concept to its most simplified form.

Italy based street artist Teo Pirisi, known as “Moneyless”, is constantly seeking to evolve his already abstract style of work. For his last major solo exhibition (covered here), he sought inspiration in geometrical shapes and patterns. These, he feels, are the fundamentals of life that at their core represent a multitude of possibility. As such, they appear throughout his graffiti writing, painting, drawings and found object installations. For his current exhibition, “Fragmentations,” at BC Gallery in Berlin, Moneyless reduces this concept to its most simplified form. In what he describes as a deconstruction, shapes that once touched and overlapped are split into fragments. The result is a more animate and energetic version of his earlier artworks. Those pieces also displayed movement by guiding the eye through a continuous, flowing motion. Here, the viewer’s eye bounces from sliver to sliver of line and color. Take a look at more photos of “Fragmentations” below, courtesy of the artist and the gallery.

“Fragmentations” by Moneyless is now on view at BC Gallery through June 27th.

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