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Christina West’s Boldly Colored Sculptures of “Intimate Strangers”

Figurative and boldly colored, Christina West makes sculptures that combine both serious and playful subject matter. Often, she employs scale to disorient her viewer and emphasize a certain sense of isolation. West contradicts their feeling of quiet loneliness with her loud palette. She paints her sculptures in a hot pink or bold white, a reference to the classical figures that inspire her. Take a look at her latest series, "Intimate Strangers", after the jump.

Figurative and boldly colored, Christina West makes sculptures that combine both serious and playful subject matter. Often, she employs scale to disorient her viewer and emphasize a certain sense of isolation. West contradicts their feeling of quiet loneliness with her loud palette. She paints her sculptures in a hot pink or bold white, a reference to the classical figures that inspire her. Her work’s relationship to its physical surroundings is another aspect of West’s storytelling.  The figures in her current exhibition “Intimate Strangers” at Mindy Solomon Gallery in Miami range from half size to larger than life. Caught in awkward, intimate positions, they gaze into the distance as if looking for someone else, but fail to make any connection. Even those who physically touch or share the same space do not exchange contact. They are destined to remain strangers.

“Intimate Strangers” by Christina West is now on view at Mindy Solomon Gallery through July 3rd.

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