Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

“Product Displacement” Group Show Explores the Role of Advertising in Art

In today's advertising world, it's almost impossible the avoid visual landscape of company brand names and logos. We endulge in a pop culture that is virtually paid for and made possible by "product placement", creating often unwelcome interruptions. This Saturday, CHG Circa gallery's artists have chosen to interrupt their own imagery in "Product Displacement". Consumerism is a necessary evil to a healthy economy that has intrigued artists for decades. Perhaps the most famous example is Andy Warhol, whose works like the Campbell soup cans forced us to reckon with big business' presence in our lives. Artists such as Eric Joyner, Buff Monster, Shag, Brandi Milne, Richard J. Oliver, Andrew Brandou, Ron English, and Sylvia Ji take a cue from artists like Warhol to publicize their own experiences with advertising.


Richard J. Oliver

In today’s advertising world, it’s almost impossible the avoid visual landscape of company brand names and logos. We endulge in a pop culture that is virtually paid for and made possible by “product placement”, creating often unwelcome interruptions. This Saturday, CHG Circa gallery’s artists have chosen to interrupt their own imagery in “Product Displacement”. Consumerism is a necessary evil to a healthy economy that has intrigued artists for decades. Perhaps the most famous example is Andy Warhol, whose works like the Campbell soup cans forced us to reckon with big business’ presence in our lives. Artists such as Eric Joyner, Buff Monster, Shag, Brandi Milne, Richard J. Oliver, Andrew Brandou, Ron English, and Sylvia Ji take a cue from artists like Warhol to publicize their own experiences with advertising. Richard J. Oliver, for instance, contemplates our dangerous addiction to gasoline and machinery, fueled by relentness promotion. His painting “Built to Last” counters this with a plea for cleaner and more efficient means of transportation. Brandi Milne found inspiration rather than frustration with her subject, a fictional opiate from the Game of Thrones novels/HBO series. She shares, “With the product being so ominous, I wanted to play on the sweet side of the snowmen – naively dunking cookies into the milk as if it’s your wholesome milk and cookies scenario. An homage to the turn of the century ads in which corporations sold you poison with a promise of health & happiness.” Her sentiment represents the show’s core theme, which balances the good and evil aspects of commercialism. Take a look at our preview of “Product Displacement” below.


Brandi Milne


Sylvia Ji


Shag


Ron English


Eric Joyner


Buff Monster


Redd Walitzki


Andrew Brandou

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Illustrious fantasies unravel in the "Dreamlands" group show, opening at Corey Helford Gallery's CHG Circa space on March 14. Guest curator Caro (who is also our Hi-Fructose staff blogger) brings her Japanese Pop Art-inspired aesthetic to the show; she works with many of the featured artists, like So Youn Lee and Hikari Shimoda, through her arts platform Sweet Streets. The exhibition features 35 artists, many of whom our readers will recognize, such as Naoto Hattori, Tom Bagshaw, Hannah Faith Yata, Lola, Kazuki Takamatsu (HF Vol. 33 cover artist), and many others. The artists in the show were invited to interpret their dreams, and the resulting work is soft, utopian, and surreal.
Colored pencils haven't quite received the recognition of their counterparts as a fine art material- and yet over the years, we've featured artists from all over the world who have surprised us with what can be achieved by these utensils from our elementary school sets. CHG Circa in Los Angeles sent a group of international artists a set of their own and invited them to refer back to their child imagination.

Brandi Milne

It's the 51st Volume of Hi-Fructose! The spring issue features: The strange geometric paintings of Yu Maeda, the ornate head dresses of Magnhild Kennedy, collages by John Vochatzer, the powerful paintings of Sergé Gay Jr, the gravity defying art of Cintal Vidal, the elastic illustrations of Angela Ho, the dangerously dark world of Peter Ferguson, the glass sculptures of Amber Cowan, the autobiographical paintings of Stuart Pearson Wright, a review on the documentary and upcoming books of sculptor Stanislaw Szukalski, Plus a 16-page special insert section the paintings of cover artist Brandi Milne and more. HF Vol.51 arrives in April. Pre-order a copy of the issue here! Also, US residents can subscribe here, and Canadian residents can subscribe here.
Brandi Milne’s pop-surrealist, acrylic paintings are both sweet and strange, each a peek into the artist’s modern-day and childhood influences. A new body of work "Once Upon a Quiet Kingdom," is collected in a show at Corey Helford Gallery in Los Angeles, which kicked off on Saturday. This is her fourth solo exhibition.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List