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Moody Charcoal Drawings by Levi van Levuw

Levi van Levuw cultivates a sense of mystery and foreboding with his chiaroscuro charcoal drawings, which feature inanimate objects scattered in empty rooms that appear devoid of a human presence. Whether drawing palm trees, bookshelves, drawers, or stairs, Levuw's presentation of these items is highly stylized and architectural. He appears interested in studying their formal qualities and creating new patterns with objects his viewers would normally consider mundane.

Levi van Levuw cultivates a sense of mystery and foreboding with his chiaroscuro charcoal drawings, which feature inanimate objects scattered in empty rooms that appear devoid of a human presence. Whether drawing palm trees, bookshelves, drawers, or stairs, Levuw’s presentation of these items is highly stylized and architectural. He appears interested in studying their formal qualities and creating new patterns with objects his viewers would normally consider mundane.

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