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Lernert & Sander’s Latest Work Features Perfect Cubes Meticulously Cut from Food Items

There's something ridiculously satisfying about looking at Lernert & Sander's latest photography project. The Dutch duo cut various types of foods — from raw tuna to kiwis to Romanesco broccoli — into perfect, bite-sized cubes and arranged everything in a meticulously planned-out grid. The piece includes 98 total cubes measuring two-and-a-half cubic centimeters each. The photo was originally commissioned by a Dutch newspaper for their food issue, but has gone viral internationally since its release.

There’s something ridiculously satisfying about looking at Lernert & Sander’s latest photography project. The Dutch duo cut various types of foods — from raw tuna to kiwis to Romanesco broccoli — into perfect, bite-sized cubes and arranged everything in a meticulously planned-out grid. The piece includes 98 total cubes measuring two-and-a-half cubic centimeters each. The photo was originally commissioned by a Dutch newspaper for their food issue, but has gone viral internationally since its release.

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