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Anouk Wipprecht Uses Cutting-Edge Technology to Create Interactive Garments

No matter how attractively someone is dressed, invading their personal space is never okay. Designer Anouk Wipprecht uses this concept as the inspiration for her Spider dress, a 3D printed, chic garment outfitted with micro-controllers. The dress' pronounced epaulettes feature arachnid-like, moving limbs that will jut out at anyone who gets too close. Wipprecht, who is based in the Netherlands, partnered with Intel to create the technology for this innovative, wearable piece.

No matter how attractively someone is dressed, invading their personal space is never okay. Designer Anouk Wipprecht uses this concept as the inspiration for her Spider dress, a 3D printed, chic garment outfitted with micro-controllers. The dress’ pronounced epaulettes feature arachnid-like, moving limbs that will jut out at anyone who gets too close. Wipprecht, who is based in the Netherlands, partnered with Intel to create the technology for this innovative, wearable piece.

Across her body of work over the past few years, Wipprecht has sought to create clothing that communicates its wearer’s mental state to the outside world. For instance, one of her other dresses, Synapse, uses a headpiece that gauges how alert, relaxed, or stressed the wearer is, providing an emotional map of the ways that stimuli effect them throughout the day and communicating those emotions through different colored lights. Her recent project, the Faraday Dress, which she designed during her residency at the software company Autodesk, uses Tesla coils to emit bright, lighting-like bolts, inviting a (dangerous-looking) performance aspect to the work, as well. Check out some of Wipprect’s pieces below.

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