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Josephine Cardin’s Emotive Self-Portraits

Josephine Cardin's background in dance comes through in her series of surreal self-portraits, many of which have digitally illustrated elements that take them into the realm of fantasy. With the series, Cardin explores the various identities one takes on in life, acting out emotions and frustrations in front of her camera. Moving gracefully in long, billowing gowns that amplify her movements, Cardin exposes her vulnerable side through body language and the careful inclusion of symbolic props.

Josephine Cardin’s background in dance comes through in her series of surreal self-portraits, many of which have digitally illustrated elements that take them into the realm of fantasy. With the series, Cardin explores the various identities one takes on in life, acting out emotions and frustrations in front of her camera. Moving gracefully in long, billowing gowns that amplify her movements, Cardin exposes her vulnerable side through body language and the careful inclusion of symbolic props.

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