Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada Creates New Murals From a Bird’s Eye View

While it's tempting to call what Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada does "street art," his Terrestrial Series isn't experienced in quite the same way as a mural. He recently unveiled two gigantic pieces — one in San Antonio, Texas and one in Paris — that can only be comprehended fully from a bird's eye view. Viewers on the ground have a unique access point of being able to walk through the portraits, which form a cohesive whole only from above.

While it’s tempting to call what Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada does “street art,” his Terrestrial Series isn’t experienced in quite the same way as a mural. He recently unveiled two gigantic pieces — one in San Antonio, Texas and one in Paris — that can only be comprehended fully from a bird’s eye view. Viewers on the ground have a unique access point of being able to walk through the portraits, which form a cohesive whole only from above.

Rodriguez-Gerada’s portraiture might seem straightforward, but the subjects he chooses always have a social significance to the places where he creates his work. His new piece in San Antonio, “Nyssa,” was painted on the site of what is believed to be the first human settlement in the San Antonio area. The subject of the piece is a mixed-race girl who symbolizes the many cultures that coexist in the city. While San Antonio has had troubled race relations in the past, “Nyssa” looks hopefully into the future.

The piece Rodriguez-Gerada created in Paris, “Grounded Gratitude,” is one of the largest realistic portraits in existence. Spanning 4,000 square feet, it can now be seen from Google Earth. Created for the In Stu festival, “Grounded Gratitude” is an homage to Nicole Picquart, an activist for the rights of the poor.

Rodriguez-Gerada also recently created a mural in Buenos Aires, Argentina at the Isauro Arancibia Education Center, a school especially for children living in poverty. Titled “David,” the mural pictures an 11 year old boy who is a student at the center. The piece seeks to put a human face to the school’s plight. Currently, it’s in danger of being demolished to make room for a new bus line, and Rodriguez-Gerada created the piece to draw attention to the good work Isauro Arancibia Education Center does for the community.

“Nyssa,” San Antonio, Texas:

“Grounded Gratitude,” Paris, France:


Screen shot from Google Earth

“David,” Buenos Aires, Argentina:

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Colombian artist GLeo covers walls across the world with her vibrant murals, with figures often adorned with masks and other surreal embellishments. She emerged as a popular muralist in her native South America, but she now brings these homegrown influences to spots everywhere. Much of her mural work is accomplished with brushstrokes, offering absorbing textures.
Oliver Vernon just finished his largest mural ever, a massive project organized by Kirk Gallery in Denmark. Working 12-hour days over two weeks, he created a piece that reflects his dynamic, abstract style. Vernon was last featured on HiFructose.com here.
Yok is an Australian born artist raised on Ren & Stimpy and skateboarding graphics, while Sheryo is a Brooklyn based Singaporean artist with an affinity for kitsch and pulp illustrations. Together, the New York based duo calls themselves Yok & Sheryo, whose equally cheeky love for counter culture is reflected in their art. We first featured their murals on our blog, where they combine their signature styles in frenzied images that include surreal characters and motifs like pizza and palm trees. Their collective works tell stories inspired by their travels and misadventures, which have recently taken them to the islands of Indonesia, sparking ideas for a new set of characters.
Howard Griffin Gallery is currently setting up "Perception," the debut London solo show of Iranian painter and muralist Medhi Ghadyanloo. For this show, the artist will create a full-scale sculptural installation at the gallery space and exhibit a new body of work that is loaded with symbolism. During his stay in London, the artist will be creating a series of outdoors murals around the British capital similar to the ones he's been creating in his hometown of Tehran.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List