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Bozka’s Intricate Nature Illustrations and Paper-Cut Works

Polish illustrator Bozena Rydlewska, aka Bozka, draws ornate nature illustrations where flora and fauna come together to form graceful shapes and symmetrical compositions. Bozka's depiction of nature is romanticized and almost fairytale-esque, and she turns some of her 2D works into pop-ups that evoke the 3D effects in some children's books. She often combines floral forms found on land with aquatic life, creating unexpected mash-ups of various ecosystems. Check out some of Bozka's latest works below.

Polish illustrator Bozena Rydlewska, aka Bozka, draws ornate nature illustrations where flora and fauna come together to form graceful shapes and symmetrical compositions. Bozka’s depiction of nature is romanticized and almost fairytale-esque, and she turns some of her 2D works into pop-ups that evoke the 3D effects in some children’s books. She often combines floral forms found on land with aquatic life, creating unexpected mash-ups of various ecosystems. Check out some of Bozka’s latest works below.

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