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Preview: Hideyuki Katsumata’s “Hide in my Brain” at Hellion Gallery

Hellion Gallery in Portland has become an unlikely purveyor of Japanese contemporary art thanks to curator Matt Wagner, who makes frequent trips to Tokyo and is well-acquainted with the scene there. Their next exhibition is Hideyuki Katsumata's "Hide in my Brain," a collection of loud, unapologetically obscene paintings debuting on April 2. Spirits and demons engaging strange, erotic activities abound in Katsumata's unhinged compositions — which he fills with hallucinatory colors and brisk line work. "Hide in my Brain" will be his first solo show in the US, and, as the title suggests, it offers great insight into the artist's strange mind.

Hellion Gallery in Portland has become an unlikely purveyor of Japanese contemporary art thanks to curator Matt Wagner, who makes frequent trips to Tokyo and is well-acquainted with the scene there. Their next exhibition is Hideyuki Katsumata’s “Hide in my Brain,” a collection of loud, unapologetically obscene paintings debuting on April 2. Spirits and demons engaging strange, erotic activities abound in Katsumata’s unhinged compositions — which he fills with hallucinatory colors and brisk line work. “Hide in my Brain” will be his first solo show in the US, and, as the title suggests, it offers great insight into the artist’s strange mind.

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