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Gerry Judah’s Sculptural Work Draws Viewers in Through Spectacle

Mundane elements of city life like cars, bicycles, and architecture become sites for imaginative play in Gerry Judah's sculptural work, which often combines the otherworldly and the utilitarian. From his various flying car installations to his recent "Bengal" series, in which models of religious temples precariously balance on top of bicycles, Judah initially captivates viewers with spectacle. But the attention-grabbing visual components are what lead one to explore the more serious themes that Judah broaches.


Installation at Goodwood Festival of Speed, 2011.

Mundane elements of city life like cars, bicycles, and architecture become sites for imaginative play in Gerry Judah’s sculptural work, which often combines the otherworldly and the utilitarian. From his various flying car installations to his recent “Bengal” series, in which models of religious temples precariously balance on top of bicycles, Judah initially captivates viewers with spectacle. But the attention-grabbing visual components are what lead one to explore the more serious themes that Judah broaches. A descendent of Iraqi Jews who immigrated to India and then the UK, Judah’s past work ruminates on such topics as environmental destruction in the third world, war, and genocide — namely, the Holocaust. Judah has a solo show, “Fragile Lands,” coming up on May 19 at Copeland Gallery in London presented by Encounter Contemporary. In anticipation of his exhibition, we take a look at some of his older work below.


Installation at Goodwood Festival of Speed, 2011.


Goodwood Festival of Speed, 2009.


Goodwood Festival of Speed, 2009.

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