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Preview: Sam Jinks at Mark Straus Gallery

Sam Jinks's sculptures (featured in HF Vol. 27) are eerily realistic. Using resin, silicone, pigment, and human hair, the Australian artist builds uncanny human likenesses with all their imperfections laid bare. Jinks's work is highly detailed and includes elements like chipped fingernails, wrinkles, and protruding bones. His protagonists, many of whom have an emaciated appearance, appear to have survived many trials and tribulations. Though Jinks doesn't present us with a narrative to parse through, his characters' nude bodies are like roadmaps to their life journeys. The artist has a solo show coming up at Mark Straus Gallery in New York on March 29 featuring new and archival work. Check out a preview below.

Sam Jinks’s sculptures (featured in HF Vol. 27) are eerily realistic. Using resin, silicone, pigment, and human hair, the Australian artist builds uncanny human likenesses with all their imperfections laid bare. Jinks’s work is highly detailed and includes elements like chipped fingernails, wrinkles, and protruding bones. His protagonists, many of whom have an emaciated appearance, appear to have survived many trials and tribulations. Though Jinks doesn’t present us with a narrative to parse through, his characters’ nude bodies are like roadmaps to their life journeys. The artist has a solo show coming up at Mark Straus Gallery in New York on March 29 featuring new and archival work. Check out a preview below.

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