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Pip and Pop’s Latest Confectionary Installations

If Pip and Pop's colorful work looks good enough to eat, that's because it is — sort of. The artist creates bright, crystalline installations using sugary candy, glitter, and cheap toys and knickknacks. These elements accumulate into mystical, glimmering environments filled with pastel-colored sand dunes, rainbow-hued rocks, and enchanted-looking flora. Based in Australia, Pip and Pop began as a duo comprised of Tanya Schultz and Nicole Andrijevic. In 2011, Andrijevic left to pursue other projects and Schultz has been the brains behind the operation since, often inviting guest artists to collaborate with her. Since we last featured Pip and Pop in 2012 (here), she has created confectionary paradises at various venues in the Netherlands, Japan, Taiwan, and Australia. Take a look at her recent work below.


Supernatural tasks and magic objects. (Tanya Schultz with Alex Bishop-Thorpe, Amy Joy Watson, Aurelia Carbone, Bridget Minuzzo & Jemimah Davis). Carclew Youth Arts. Adelaide, Australia 2013.

If Pip and Pop’s colorful work looks good enough to eat, that’s because it is — sort of. The artist creates bright, crystalline installations using sugary candy, glitter, and cheap toys and knickknacks. These elements accumulate into mystical, glimmering environments filled with pastel-colored sand dunes, rainbow-hued rocks, and enchanted-looking flora. Based in Australia, Pip and Pop began as a duo comprised of Tanya Schultz and Nicole Andrijevic. In 2011, Andrijevic left to pursue other projects and Schultz has been the brains behind the operation since, often inviting guest artists to collaborate with her. Since we last featured Pip and Pop in 2012 (here), she has created confectionary paradises at various venues in the Netherlands, Japan, Taiwan, and Australia. Take a look at her recent work below.


Supernatural tasks and magic objects. (Tanya Schultz with Alex Bishop-Thorpe, Amy Joy Watson, Aurelia Carbone, Bridget Minuzzo & Jemimah Davis). Carclew Youth Arts. Adelaide, Australia 2013.


Supernatural tasks and magic objects. (Tanya Schultz with Alex Bishop-Thorpe, Amy Joy Watson, Aurelia Carbone, Bridget Minuzzo & Jemimah Davis). Carclew Youth Arts. Adelaide, Australia 2013.


Through a hole in the mountain. MT Kurashiki, Japan 2014.


Through a hole in the mountain. MT Kurashiki, Japan 2014.


Through a hole in the mountain. MT Kurashiki, Japan 2014.


Peach blossom Very Fun Park. Fubon Art Foundation. Taipei, Taiwan 2014.


Peach blossom Very Fun Park. Fubon Art Foundation. Taipei, Taiwan 2014.


Peach blossom Very Fun Park. Fubon Art Foundation. Taipei, Taiwan 2014.

Candy Lab Lightness Mediamatic. Amsterdam, Netherlands 2014.


Candy Lab Lightness Mediamatic. Amsterdam, Netherlands 2014.


Candy Lab Lightness Mediamatic. Amsterdam, Netherlands 2014.

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