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Lotus Building Blossoms Out of Artificial Lake in Wujin, China

In 2013, Australian architecture firm Studio505 completed the Lotus Building, a community center set atop an artificial lake in Wujin, China. The city government commissioned the sculptural building to serve as a public park and multi-use space with exhibition and conference rooms that are open to the public. The building extends two stories under water and visitors must enter it from below and ascend to a cathedral-like peek with large windows that allow for plenty of natural light. A creative architectural creation, the Lotus Building is a modern-day landmark in an age when architecture is typically minimalistic and functional.

In 2013, Australian architecture firm Studio505 completed the Lotus Building, a community center set atop an artificial lake in Wujin, China. The city government commissioned the sculptural building to serve as a public park and multi-use space with exhibition and conference rooms that are open to the public. The building extends two stories under water and visitors must enter it from below and ascend to a cathedral-like peek with large windows that allow for plenty of natural light. A creative architectural creation, the Lotus Building is a modern-day landmark in an age when architecture is typically minimalistic and functional.

Photos by John Gollings.

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