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Preview: “Born Again” by Kenny Scharf at Honor Fraser Gallery

Although he is best known for his humorous graffiti and imagery, Kenny Scharf has long been interested in more serious political topics. His solo exhibition "Born Again", opening this Saturday at Honor Fraser gallery, highlights his unique ability to make the mundane more fun. In his latest series, bright and colorful palette and wacky shapes are painted onto repurposed, found art. It's not all fun and games for the artist, who sees his comical approach as an act of defiance.

Although he is best known for his humorous graffiti and imagery, Kenny Scharf has long been interested in more serious political topics. His solo exhibition “Born Again”, opening this Saturday at Honor Fraser gallery, highlights his unique ability to make the mundane more fun. In his latest series, bright and colorful palette and wacky shapes are painted onto repurposed, found art. It’s not all fun and games for the artist, who sees his comical approach as an act of defiance. For example, his “Fukushima Landing” piece shows a dark colored character interrupting a beautiful landscape in a commentary about the Fukushima Japan nuclear disaster and its affects. Other works comment on themes of pollution and wastefulness that he believes has become synonymous with American culture. These bring to mind his earlier works of found object art like retro phones, washers and television sets, which will also be on display in a salon-style installation. This includes his collage and video art created between the years 1979-1984, on view for the first time. While “Born Again” offers passionately more abstract work from Scharf, it’s not necessarily a departure for the artist who has always been sensitive to social issues. Check out our preview of “Born Again” below.

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