Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Preview: Mehdi Ghadyanloo’s “Perception” at Howard Griffin Gallery

Howard Griffin Gallery is currently setting up "Perception," the debut London solo show of Iranian painter and muralist Medhi Ghadyanloo. For this show, the artist will create a full-scale sculptural installation at the gallery space and exhibit a new body of work that is loaded with symbolism. During his stay in London, the artist will be creating a series of outdoors murals around the British capital similar to the ones he's been creating in his hometown of Tehran.

Photo courtesy of Marcus Peel.

Howard Griffin Gallery is currently setting up “Perception,” the debut London solo show of Iranian painter and muralist Medhi Ghadyanloo. For this show, the artist will create a full-scale sculptural installation at the gallery space and exhibit a new body of work that is loaded with symbolism. During his stay in London, the artist will be creating a series of outdoors murals around the British capital similar to the ones he’s been creating in his hometown of Tehran.

Ghadyanloo started getting international recognition when his unique murals went viral. Working with Beautification Bureau of Tehran’s municipality, he painted over 100 murals in his hometown in the last 8 years, aiming to “beautify” the gray and polluted city. His surrealist works include play with perspectives, altered realities, and gravity-defying characters and scenarios, and often use optical illusions. Often incorporating nearby buildings and objects into his work, his murals dominate the landscape of Iranian capital.

Though technically similar, the subjects of his canvas works are much darker and more direct. Using a muted palette and empty landscapes, random floating or geometrical objects give a sense of unease to his work. His pieces carry a sense of uncertainty and tension. His visual minimalism suggests a failed utopia, which can be seen as a representation of a world-wide phenomenon as well as more focused critique of post-revolutionary Iran. The show will open on February 26 at Howard Griffin Gallery and will stay on view through April 2.

Photo courtesy of Marcus Peel.

Photo courtesy of Marcus Peel.

Photo courtesy of Marcus Peel.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Students at Salem Visual and Performing Arts Academy in Virginia got a new teacher early this morning. Polish-born street artist Olek (featured in HF Vol. 29) known for her candy-colored crocheted installations, shared her talents with 30 lucky students in a special workshop hosted by Virginia MOCA. "It's nice to be back in high school!", Olek shared in an instagram post. "It was so worth to wake up at 7:15am to meet these amazing young individuals." The workshop was held in anticipation of the artist's free public workshop series as part of the "Turn the Page: Ten Years of Hi-Fructose" exhibition coming to the museum next spring.
Shepard Fairey (interviewed here) is now working on his largest mural to date in Detroit. Located at ONE Campus Martius at "the Belt" and measuring 180' x 60' feet, it is a permanent fixture to the area playing host to his upcoming solo exhibition, "Printed Matters". Opening this Friday at Library Street Collective, the show will feature a variety of Fairey's latest printed materials, serigraphs on paper, collage, and editions on paper and metal. Check out our coverage of the mural in progress after the jump.
Argentinian artist Franco Fasoli, aka JAZ (previously covered here), created this large-scale mural for Color Walk Festival, Mexico last week. The piece coincides with an ongoing national protest. Known as the 2014 Iguala Mass Kidnapping, on September 26th, 43 trainee teachers were abducted and apparently massacred by military forces.
"An ancient mosaic looks exactly as intended by the artist who produced it over two millennia ago. What else can claim that kind of staying power? I find this idea simply amazing," says street artist Jim Bachor. Bachor's current series "Treats in the Streets" fills potholes in his home town of Chicago with playful mosaics of icecream and popsicles. Using the same materials as ancient craftsmen, they are made with thousands of colorful pieces of glass and marble set in mortar which protects each piece. The icecreams are part of an ongoing project where the artist takes pothole suggestions from his fans online, and then fills them with images of things like fish, candy, cereal, french fries, and words like "pothole."

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List