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Preview: “Wavelengths” 7-Artist Exhibition at GR2

Tomorrow, Giant Robot's GR2 gallery will introduce seven like-minded artists with a shared vision of fantasy and spiritual worlds. "Wavelengths" artists Stasia Burrington, Elliot Brown, Aaron Brown, Albert Reyes, Aya Kakeda, Jen Tong and Taehoon Kim are just as eclectic in their media choices, especially sculpture. Each artist tells a vignette featuring their signature styles with Japanese art undertones.


Jen Tong

Tomorrow, Giant Robot’s GR2 gallery will introduce seven like-minded artists with a shared vision of fantasy and spiritual worlds. “Wavelengths” artists Stasia Burrington, Elliot Brown, Aaron Brown, Albert Reyes, Aya Kakeda, Jen Tong and Taehoon Kim are just as eclectic in their media choices, especially sculpture. Each artist tells a vignette featuring their signature styles with Japanese art undertones. Aya Kakeda’s ceramics portray friendly bears in endearing and squeamish poses, paired next to gnome-like figures with experimental, drippy colors. They seem straight out of the illustrations of Jen Wong, whose fantasy world is heavily inspired by Hayao Miyazaki’s Ghibli studio. Her characters recall The Secret World of Arrietty, where tiny, magical scenes take place when we aren’t looking. There’s a bit of Miyazaki in Aaron Brown’s colorful deer bust as well, with its infinitely winding antlers. Seattle based artist Stasia Burrington’s work has a more historical reference. Her female subjects are shown in deep sleep and wrapped in long black hair in the style of Japanese Yūrei, or spirits. Check out our preview of these works and more below.

“Wavelengths” exhibits at GR2 from February 21st through March 11th.


Jen Tong


Jen Tong


Aya Kakeda


Aya Kakeda


Aaron Brown


Stasia Burrington


Stasia Burrington

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