Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Psychedelic Animations and GIFs by Nicolas Fong

Nicolas Fong creates GIFS and short animated films filled with peculiar characters and imaginative scenarios. In his work, psychedelic shapes morph into one another as dreamlike narratives unravel. In a recent video Fong created for the band BRNS' song "Many Changes," an abstract, underwater creature evolves into many different lifeforms. The video highlights the cyclical nature of life and the beauty of the natural world. In another video for Forever Pavot's song "Green Nap," smoke filling an 1800s-style opium den floats to the ceiling, revealing kaleidoscopic visuals and trippy patterns. Take a look at some of Fong's work below and follow his Vimeo channel to see more of his films.

Nicolas Fong creates GIFS and short animated films filled with peculiar characters and imaginative scenarios. In his work, psychedelic shapes morph into one another as dreamlike narratives unravel. In a recent video Fong created for the band BRNS’ song “Many Changes,” an abstract, underwater creature evolves into many different lifeforms. The video highlights the cyclical nature of life and the beauty of the natural world. In another video for Forever Pavot’s song “Green Nap,” smoke filling an 1800s-style opium den floats to the ceiling, revealing kaleidoscopic visuals and trippy patterns. Take a look at some of Fong’s work below and follow his Vimeo channel to see more of his films.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Animator Tyson Ibele’s development of “tyFlow, a particle simulation tool for 3dsmax” has resulted in some absorbing creations. From writhing worm monsters and unraveling pixelated characters to a wave of colliding cyclists, Ibele’s tests move between humorous and disconcerting.
Eggs bounce off of a stack of plates; a glass dissolves around a solid chunk of milk. Mainframe North, the Manchester-based arm of the motion design and VFX group Mainframe, recently put together a compilation of objects defying their natural properties and physics.
Tokyo based collective known as teamLab describe themselves as "ultra-technologists", artists who seek to merge art, technology and design in their work, designed to allow viewers to have a more personal and unique connection with art. With Japanese designer Toshiyuki Inoko at the helm, the collective's installations are nothing short of magical- featured here on our blog, they are a spontaneous experience where artworks come to "life" as animation when approached by visitors. The secret to the magic behind their work is motion sensors that pick up the viewer’s movements, prompting paintings of the natural world to become a blooming and wilting garden of delights. Pace Art + Technology in Silicon Valley, California, seeking to create an environment that encourages educational play, invited teamLab to join their Future Park series- the result of which is "Living Digital Space and Future Parks" opening on February 6th.
Swoon first garnered recognition for her pasted portraits in public spaces, but a new show represents an evolution for the artist, currently showing at Deitch's New York venue. "Cicada" collects new films, installations, and drawings from the artist, who was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 36. The sweeping show runs through Feb. 1, 2020. (Installation photos in this story by Genevieve Hanson.)

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List