Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Preview: Fernando Botero’s “BOTERO” at Gary Nader Gallery

Celebrated Colombian artist Fernando Botero will show some of his most important works from over the course of his lengthy career in his retrospective, "BOTERO," on view February 19 through the end of March at Gary Nader Gallery in New York. Known for the rotund figures that inhabit his paintings, the 82-year-old-artist had his first solo show in 1951. Since then, he has made a name for himself internationally for his poignant work, which often features social and political critiques. Some of the proceeds from "BOTERO" will benefit El Museo Del Barrio, a Latin American cultural center in New York City.

Celebrated Colombian artist Fernando Botero will show some of his most important works from over the course of his lengthy career in his retrospective, “BOTERO,” on view February 19 through the end of March at Gary Nader Gallery in New York. Known for the rotund figures that inhabit his paintings, the 82-year-old-artist had his first solo show in 1951. Since then, he has made a name for himself internationally for his poignant work, which often features social and political critiques. Some of the proceeds from “BOTERO” will benefit El Museo Del Barrio, a Latin American cultural center in New York City.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Kathy Ager’s stirring paintings, inspired by classical still-life and Baroque iconography, integrate pop cultural and personal objects. In a new show at Thinkspace Projects, titled “Golden Age,” her recent explorations are offered, each showing the artist’s knack in both realism and graphical, toon-influenced rendering. The show opens tomorrow and runs through July 20.
Chinese artist Liu Bolin is a chameleon. From a first glance, his most well-known works look like photos of newsstands and famous paintings. But as one looks closer, the artist's body emerges, painted head-to-toe to blend in with his surroundings. It's like when Duchamp scribbled R. Mutt on his famous urinal and deemed it art, except for Bolin forces his audience to contemplate mundane objects and scenarios in a fine art context by inserting himself into these scenes. The theme of disappearance is fundamental here, as Bolin chooses subjects that highlight the hidden ills often cloaked in attractive packaging and glossy images. His latest solo show, "A Colorful World?" at Klein Sun Gallery is decidedly politically charged.
Often inserting phantom characters in her paintings, Shiki Taira crafts mineral pigment works on silk that mix classical Japanese painting with contemporary sensibilities. These creatures seem to coexist with the subjects in this work, providing more lighthearted fare than terror.
Artist and animation director Joe Vaux paints what he likes. His personal work is teeming with impish demons. His cheerful hellscapes are populated with lost souls, sharp toothed monstrosities, and swarms of wrong-doers. And yet, there’s an innocence to all of this. Click to read the Hi-Fructose exclusive interview with Joe Vaux.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List