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Kevin Welsh Turns Photographs Into Dizzying GIFs

pondering-loop Young photographer Kevin Welsh explores the dark turns the mind can take with his recent body of work, which focuses on the theme of delusion. In his latest pieces, Welsh turns still photographs into hypnotizing GIFs filled with dizzying patterns meant to illustrate obsessions spinning out of control. "In isolation, the mind can move and believe many different things. Delusions manifest and become inescapable," wrote Welsh in an email to Hi-Fructose. "The removal of the figure is to show the idea of a person and to try to find understanding in delusion. Repeat patterns are seemingly never ending and are used to display the reaffirmation in our minds of the delusions we face." Welsh is currently completing his degree in printmaking at the Savannah College of Art and Design, and we look forward to seeing how his work develops.

pondering-loop

Young photographer Kevin Welsh explores the dark turns the mind can take with his recent body of work, which focuses on the theme of delusion. In his latest pieces, Welsh turns still photographs into hypnotizing GIFs filled with dizzying patterns meant to illustrate obsessions spinning out of control. “In isolation, the mind can move and believe many different things. Delusions manifest and become inescapable,” wrote Welsh in an email to Hi-Fructose. “The removal of the figure is to show the idea of a person and to try to find understanding in delusion. Repeat patterns are seemingly never ending and are used to display the reaffirmation in our minds of the delusions we face.” Welsh is currently completing his degree in printmaking at the Savannah College of Art and Design, and we look forward to seeing how his work develops.

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