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Jason Hopkins’s Digitally-Rendered Structures Mimic Human Flesh

If Leatherface from Texas Chainsaw Massacre was a sculptor, he would create something that resembles Jason Hopkins's chillingly fleshy-looking digital art. Hopkins's work looks believably 3D, so much so that he refers to it as "digital sculpture." He imagines a next phase of genetic engineering where human bodies become malleable and subject to the whims of scientists working towards the next phase of technological "progress." He renders geometric, manmade-looking structures and coats them with a skin-like texture that triggers a gut reaction of revulsion. But according to the artist, that's the point: "The digital sculptures are a fusion of geometric, architectural and biological abstract forms — a bleak evolutionary future where biotechnology has been used to make perfect posthuman beings."

If Leatherface from Texas Chainsaw Massacre was a sculptor, he would create something that resembles Jason Hopkins’s chillingly fleshy-looking digital art. Hopkins’s work looks believably 3D, so much so that he refers to it as “digital sculpture.” He imagines a next phase of genetic engineering where human bodies become malleable and subject to the whims of scientists working towards the next phase of technological “progress.” He renders geometric, manmade-looking structures and coats them with a skin-like texture that triggers a gut reaction of revulsion. But according to the artist, that’s the point: “The digital sculptures are a fusion of geometric, architectural and biological abstract forms — a bleak evolutionary future where biotechnology has been used to make perfect posthuman beings.”

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