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Preview: Ekundayo’s “Collective Reflections” at Thinkspace Gallery

The colorful works of Hawaii native Ekundayo (HF Vol. 9) combine surrealism with influences from his graffiti days. His paintings sometimes lean on the nightmarish, as in his portrayal of anthropomorphic subjects in haunting scenes. On Saturday, he will debut a new series with "Collective Reflections" at Thinkspace gallery in Los Angeles. Ekundayo describes his solo as a "gift to that feeling I know we all connect to when reaching deep within ourselves." Check out our preview after the jump!

The colorful works of Hawaii native Ekundayo (HF Vol. 9) combine surrealism with influences from his graffiti days. His paintings sometimes lean on the nightmarish, as in his portrayal of anthropomorphic subjects in haunting scenes. On Saturday, he will debut a new series with “Collective Reflections” at Thinkspace gallery in Los Angeles. Ekundayo describes his solo as a “gift to that feeling I know we all connect to when reaching deep within ourselves.” By mixing humans and animals like tropical fish, turtles and monkeys, Ekundayo is thinking about interconnectivity between living things and the beauty in deformity. Ekundayo relates these ideas to “Mana”, an ancient Hawaii belief in harnessing the power that radiates from within us. At it’s core, his show take us on a journey to better understand ourselves.

Ekundayo’s “Collective Reflections” exhibits at Thinkspace Gallery January 29 through February 21, 2015.


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