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Preview: Borondo’s “Animal” at RexRomae Gallery

Spanish street artist Gonzalo Borondo, who typically goes by his last name alone, paints expressionistic portraits on unusual surfaces. The street artist creates his work with the surrounding environment in mind, his paintings responding to the architecture on which they are rendered. Borondo's solo show "Animal" opens at RexRomae Gallery in London on February 5 and features new paintings as well as installation and hand-painted animations. For the exhibition, Borondo said he investigated man's tendency to control his environment so as to distract himself from his animalistic nature and, ultimately, his mortality.


London, UK

Spanish street artist Gonzalo Borondo, who typically goes by his last name alone, paints expressionistic portraits on unusual surfaces. The street artist creates his work with the surrounding environment in mind, his paintings responding to the architecture on which they are rendered. Borondo’s solo show “Animal” opens at RexRomae Gallery in London on February 5 and features new paintings as well as installation and hand-painted animations. For the exhibition, Borondo said he investigated man’s tendency to control his environment so as to distract himself from his animalistic nature and, ultimately, his mortality.


Italy


Italy


Paris


Poland


Madrid, Spain


Italy

Studio work:

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