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Preview: “Bunnycutlet Presents” at Cotton Candy Machine

Bunnycutlet started out as a brick-and-mortar art gallery. Though it closed its doors indefinitely last year, the project lives on in the form of a traveling curatorial platform. Liz Artinian, the brains of the operation, is putting together the group show "Bunnycutlet Presents" at Cotton Candy Machine in Brooklyn. The show opens January 16 and features new, surreal, illustration-inspired work by Ryan Heshka, Jean-Paul Mallozzi, Kelly Denato, Ian Ferguson, Christy Karacas, Kristen Liu Wong, and Joohee Park. Check out a few sneak peeks below.


Ryan Heshka

Bunnycutlet started out as a brick-and-mortar art gallery. Though it closed its doors indefinitely last year, the project lives on in the form of a traveling curatorial platform. Liz Artinian, the brains of the operation, put together the group show “Bunnycutlet Presents” at Cotton Candy Machine in Brooklyn. The show opens January 16 and features new, surreal, illustration-inspired work by Ryan Heshka, Jean-Paul Mallozzi, Kelly Denato, Ian Ferguson, Christy Karacas, Kristen Liu Wong, and Joohee Park. Check out a few sneak peeks below.


Jean-Paul Mallozzi


Joohee Park


Kristen Liu Wong


Kelly Denato


Ian Ferguson

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Slimy skeletons find themselves captive in dark dungeons in Charlie Immer's latest drawings and paintings. The artist (featured in HF Vol. 11) renders sinewy textures and jelly-like consistencies to make his viewers squirm. Immer currently has a show with Paul Pope on view at Cotton Candy Machine in Brooklyn through January 4. The exhibition features several new dark yet fluorescent paintings as well as a rare look at his drawings on paper.

Celebrating its fifth annual installment on Saturday is Cotton Candy Machine's highly popular "Tiny Trifecta" group show (previously covered here). It's so popular, in fact, that the gallery has had to devise a registration system for its fans. Owing to the exhibit's demand is its concept of offering unbelievably affordable art from otherwise unattainable artists for young collectors - every piece in the show is $100. Many past contributors have returned to join newcomers to the gallery, making the show a fresh mix of illustrative styles and mediums. This year's grouping features several who have graced Hi-Fructose pages and blog, including Esao Andrews, Deedee Cheriel, Ciou, Camilla d'Errico, Dima Drjuchin, Mab Graves, Natalia Fabia, Eric Fortune, Kelly Denato, Beau Stanton, Erik Jones, Jeremy Hush, Charlie Immer, Travis Louie, Lola, Sean Mahan, Jean Paul Mallozzi, Amy Sol, Skinner, Diana Sudyka, Yoskay Yamamoto, and Yoh Nagao.

Where else might one be able to acquire a Mark Ryden piece for $100? The annual Tiny Trifecta group show at Brooklyn's Cotton Candy Machine debuted last Saturday, June 14, to an eager crowd — some of whom, according to co-owner Sean Leonard, had been camping out for several days. Curated by artist and CCM co-owner Tara McPherson, the group show featured three works each from over 100 contemporary artists — well-known figures like Marco Mazzoni, Shepard Fairey and Amy Sol, and emerging artists such as Fefe Talavera and Diana Sudyka. With the walls practically wall-papered with the array of work, the show offers a diverse sampling of fun pieces, from the illustrative to the abstract.
Though their styles differ, Hikari Shimoda (featured in HF Vol. 29) and Camilla D'Errico each use a fluorescent color palette and childlike, illustrative imagery to apprehend adult anxieties. The two artists teamed up for their two-person show "Niji Bambini" (which combines Japanese and Italian, the artists' native tongues, to translate to "Rainbow Children"), opening at Brooklyn's Cotton Candy Machine on October 10.

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