Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Joel Rea’s Paintings Show Our Smallness Compared to the Forces of Nature

The captivating paintings of artist Joel Rea presents a take on surrealism that is nothing short of awe-inspiring. The richly colored scenes that Rea creates look like stills from a vivid dream, featuring men in suits and a tiger on a seemingly endless beach. The intense detail of Rea’s renderings, combined with his use of composition, gives the paintings a breathtaking, larger-than-life feel. His human subjects look almost helpless compared to the vast grandeur of the crashing waves threatening to swallow them whole. Even the more modest scenes that Rea paints inspire a deep feeling of humility. We featured some of his previous work here and today we bring you his latest paintings.

The captivating paintings of artist Joel Rea presents a take on surrealism that is nothing short of awe-inspiring. The richly colored scenes that Rea creates look like stills from a vivid dream, featuring men in suits and a tiger on a seemingly endless beach. The intense detail of Rea’s renderings, combined with his use of composition, gives the paintings a breathtaking, larger-than-life feel. His human subjects look almost helpless compared to the vast grandeur of the crashing waves threatening to swallow them whole. Even the more modest scenes that Rea paints inspire a deep feeling of humility. We featured some of his previous work here and today we bring you his latest paintings.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Argentinian artist Francisco Diaz (aka Pastel) uses a distinct visual language in his murals. He fills his walls with patterns based on the local flora of the area he's painting in — an effective way to connect with the communities he encounters in his travels. His botanical references often address history, geography, society, and politics. Along with these nature-based elements, Pastel often paints ancient, Stone Age tools to glorify humanity's strength without referencing a specific culture. His distinct yet decorative style lends itself well to collaborations with other street artists, such as Pixel Pancho and Agostino Iacurci, who both worked with Pastel recently.

Teiji Hayama's oil paintings, often depicting the celebrities of yesterday, meditate on the idea of celebrity and how it's evolved in the digital age. In his new show at Unit London, titled "Fame," the artist offers 17 paintings that feature the likes of Monroe, Taylor, and Bowie. The show runs from Jan. 16 through Feb. 15 at the space.

While Billy Norrby's previous work was soft and airy, evoking the Romanticist paintings of the 18th century, his latest series flashes forward a few centuries to a dystopian future that calls to mind the film Bladerunner or cult science fiction author Phillip K. Dick's book covers. Norrby says he found inspiration in 1970s pulp sci-fi novels, vintage Soviet space race propaganda, and special effects from movies such as 2001. Titled "Pulsar," some of the pieces in the new series will appear next at Jonathan LeVine Gallery in New York in August. Norrby just shared some images from this body of work with us. Check it out below.
With “A Volta,” Allouche Gallery looks at the evolution of the legendary b-boy and street artist Doze Green through paintings and drawings. In the show, viewers find an artist who influenced a generation and a transformative moment in his practice upon moving to Brazil. Green was most recently featured in Hi-Fructose's print magazine with Volume 35.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List