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On View: Yayoi Kusama’s “Obsesión Infinita” at Museo Tamayo

Currently on view in Mexico City's Museo Tamayo, influential Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama's first Latin American retrospective, "Obsesión Infinita" (or "Infinite Obsession"), features an extensive array of interdisciplinary works created from 1950 to 2014. Kusama's career has taken many turns over the years (we covered her work at length in HF Vol. 25), but the artist has always maintained her penchant for the experimental and irreverent.

Infinity Mirror Room-Phalli’s Field (or Floor Show) 1965 / 2013. Courtesy of the artist.

Currently on view in Mexico City’s Museo Tamayo, influential Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama’s first Latin American retrospective, “Obsesión Infinita” (or “Infinite Obsession”), features an extensive array of interdisciplinary works created from 1950 to 2014. Kusama’s career has taken many turns over the years (we covered her work at length in HF Vol. 25), but the artist has always maintained her penchant for the experimental and irreverent.

The exhibition features her recent polkadot paintings as well as works on paper, videos, photos, sculptures, and installations — most famously the mirrored, immersive environments she calls Infinity Rooms. Repeating motifs distinguish Kusama’s work across disciplines. The exhibit explores the ways her obsessions with certain patterns and images define her practice. “Obsesión Infinita” comes to a close on January 18, so we recommend that our Mexican readers see it while they can.

Yayoi Kusama, 2011. Courtesy of Victoria Miro Gallery, London, Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo and Yayoi Kusama Studio Inc. © Yayoi Kusama

Kusama on the floor of Infinity Mirror Room – Phalli’s Field. 1965. Photo by Eikoh Hosoe.

Photo by Daniela Uribe

Photo by Daniela Uribe

Photo by Daniela Uribe

Photo by Daniela Uribe

Photo by Daniela Uribe

Photo by Daniela Uribe

Photo by Daniela Uribe

Photo by Daniela Uribe

Photo by Daniela Uribe

Photo by Daniela Uribe

Photo by Daniela Uribe

Photo by Daniela Uribe

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