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Hugo Barros’s Handmade, Psychedelic Collages

Hugo Barros is attracted to nostalgic, kitschy visuals and often arranges them in enigmatic ways in his hand-cut collages. The Lisbon-based artist uses snippets of vintage advertisements, pulp science fiction novel covers, and old family photos to create psychedelic compositions that deal with supernatural visions and apprehend our curiosity about the cosmos. He often chooses images that share similar stylistic elements despite their disparate content, resulting in absurd amalgamations that somehow retain a sense of harmony. Take a look at some of Barros's latest works below.

Hugo Barros is attracted to nostalgic, kitschy visuals and often arranges them in enigmatic ways in his hand-cut collages. The Lisbon-based artist uses snippets of vintage advertisements, pulp science fiction novel covers, and old family photos to create psychedelic compositions that deal with supernatural visions and apprehend our curiosity about the cosmos. He often chooses images that share similar stylistic elements despite their disparate content, resulting in absurd amalgamations that somehow retain a sense of harmony. Take a look at some of Barros’s latest works below.

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