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Kim Keever Constructs and Photographs Underwater Phenomena

Kim Keever's photographs may look like documentation of natural phenomena from another planet, but the artist painstakingly constructs minuscule photo sets inside a fish tank in his studio to achieve his highly detailed, abstract images. As clouds of dense pigment unfurl in the water, Keever zooms in to capture every undulating shape. The tiny explosions become awe-inspiring tornadoes of paint in his resulting work. We previously interviewed the artist here on the blog back in 2011, and today we take a look at his newest work.

Kim Keever’s photographs may look like documentation of natural phenomena from another planet, but the artist painstakingly constructs minuscule photo sets inside a fish tank in his studio to achieve his highly detailed, abstract images. As clouds of dense pigment unfurl in the water, Keever zooms in to capture every undulating shape. The tiny explosions become awe-inspiring tornadoes of paint in his resulting work. We previously interviewed the artist here on the blog back in 2011, and today we take a look at his newest work.

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