Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Kim Keever Constructs and Photographs Underwater Phenomena

Kim Keever's photographs may look like documentation of natural phenomena from another planet, but the artist painstakingly constructs minuscule photo sets inside a fish tank in his studio to achieve his highly detailed, abstract images. As clouds of dense pigment unfurl in the water, Keever zooms in to capture every undulating shape. The tiny explosions become awe-inspiring tornadoes of paint in his resulting work. We previously interviewed the artist here on the blog back in 2011, and today we take a look at his newest work.

Kim Keever’s photographs may look like documentation of natural phenomena from another planet, but the artist painstakingly constructs minuscule photo sets inside a fish tank in his studio to achieve his highly detailed, abstract images. As clouds of dense pigment unfurl in the water, Keever zooms in to capture every undulating shape. The tiny explosions become awe-inspiring tornadoes of paint in his resulting work. We previously interviewed the artist here on the blog back in 2011, and today we take a look at his newest work.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Oleg Dou’s photo manipulations subvert the elegance of classical still-life or mutate the subjects of his quiet portraits. The award-winning artist, hailing from Russia, has shown these creations in shows across the globe. Recent work takes the everyday table settings of the Renaissance and stirs sexualized conversations.
As a kid, dropping your ice cream on the sidewalk was a moment of bitter disappointment. Michael Massaia makes us remember this childlike feeling of sadness with his photographs of melted ice cream — a feeling that you know is petty yet still breaks your heart. The artist simply places popsicles on black plexiglass and watches them melt over time. The original shape of a Spiderman or Spongebob pop turns into a swirling, oil slick-like pattern of pastel colors. The melted sweets evoke a nostalgic longing for carefree summers on the playground. Ice cream pops, something we hadn't previously given much thought to, turn out to be a pretty powerful sensory symbol.
If you played with your food when you were a kid, then you might enjoy this set of wacky photographs by Benoit Jammes. The Paris based artist does just that in his playful series entitled "Skitchen" that explains "what's going on in your kitchen when you turn your back- the secret sporting life of our friends the fruits and vegetables."
Brazilian-photographer Vitor Schietti uses fireworks to create images of illuminated trees and dancing patterns in his series "Impermanent Sculptures." To produce the images, the artist sets off fireworks at twilight. When the light is just right, Schietti uses a long exposure camera. The effect is semi-painterly and always captivating. The method comes from the artist's interest in the moment of change or transformation, as well as the sociological question of how microscopic elements reflect the greater, macroscopic world. To this effect, the trees ablaze represent dual destruction and illumination. Though people and governments take climate change under serious consideration, we continue to destroy our shared environment. The burning tree is an all-too common phenomena in an age of extreme weather and drought, but it is also an ancient symbol shared across cultures. Captured in a photograph by Schiette, the burning tree inspires ominous feelings of both awe and doom. 

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List