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The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Lena Klyukina’s Surreal Drawings of Nature and the Cosmos

Lena Klyukina's drawings of interplanetary exploration overflow with surreal details. In one piece, a hot air balloon approaches an enormous fish that floats above a row of suburban houses, seemingly descended from the starlit sky above. In another, a woman with six breasts wrestles with the ungainly sattelite attached to her head. Klyukina appears interested in exploring the intersection between humans, nature, and the cosmos, and our often misguided attempts at understanding the universe. Take a look at some of her latest work below.

Lena Klyukina’s drawings of interplanetary exploration overflow with surreal details. In one piece, a hot air balloon approaches an enormous fish that floats above a row of suburban houses, seemingly descended from the starlit sky above. In another, a woman with six breasts wrestles with the ungainly sattelite attached to her head. Klyukina appears interested in exploring the intersection between humans, nature, and the cosmos, and our often misguided attempts at understanding the universe. Take a look at some of her latest work below.

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