Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Frédérique Morrel Wraps Animals in Vintage Tapestry

French artist Frederique Morrel (Vol 28) breathes new life into old taxidermy. She calls it the animals' revenge, under appreciated as a stuffed head on a wall and reborn as something to be admired. Simultaneously, the dying art of embroidery is made new and contemporary. To Morrel, her sculptures symbolize a reimagining of oppulence, bringing to mind artists Olek and Karley Feaver. Morrel's concept may sound simple: repurposing vintage tapestry that she collects from second-hand shops and covering animals with it, but it's not.

French artist Frederique Morrel (Vol 28) breathes new life into old taxidermy. She calls it the animals’ revenge, under appreciated as a stuffed head on a wall and reborn as something to be admired. Simultaneously, the dying art of embroidery is made new and contemporary. To Morrel, her sculptures symbolize a reimagining of oppulence, bringing to mind artists Olek and Karley Feaver. Morrel’s concept may sound simple: repurposing vintage tapestry that she collects from second-hand shops and covering animals with it, but it’s not. In fact, the busts are foam sculptures pulled from her own fiberglass molds of deer, foxes, rabbits and imaginary creatures like unicorns. She shares, “These tapestries appeared to be the most accurate material to illustrate my work about modern vanities, loss of the paradise and rebirth in a better world.” For more photos of her work, check out our studio visit here.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
In using animal remains to create something new, Jason Borders' intricate work reminds us of the cyclical nature of life. First featured here on our blog, Borders has always been inspired by nature and always collected bones, but it wasn't until recently that he began to use them as an art medium. He once said that he likes to think of these sculptural pieces as characters, ornately carved bones, antlers and skulls which are designed on the spur of the moment in his Portland, Oregon based studio.
Using painted resin, wood, and metal, New York-based artist Jiannan Wu’s recent relief sculptures feature scenes ripped from urban environments. The artist often plays with perspective whether it’s his distorted “Selfie” series or a visit to the city’s subway backdrops. A statement says that Wu is always considering multiple dimensions in his work.
One man's trash is Khalil Chishtee's treasure. We previously featured the Pakistani artist's ethereal garbage bag sculptures back in 2013, where he breathed new life into unwanted found-objects. Having just come off his debut solo exhibition, "Detritus from Exploded Stars" at Sanat Gallery, Chishtee has since expanded his concept to dig deeper. His latest works make the connection between art created from practically nothing to the creation of life from an empty universe.
There’s a problematic aspect to Hiromi Tango’s sculptures that invites the viewer's intervention, simply because they are a complete mess. Tangled bits of string, plush and rigid baubles are knotted together into a bulbous hodgepodge around a core of light, sometimes with a single word sculpted in neon at the center. Strands of fabric and material reach out like dendrites on a neuron, feeling for a connection but isolated from everything on a blank white gallery wall, asking the viewer to sit a while and try to untangle it.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List