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Fantich & Young’s Toothy Shoe Sculptures for their “Apex Predator” Series

London artist duo Mariana Fantich and Dominic Young, collectively known as Fantich & Young, create innovative sculptures using found objects. Fantich & Young's humorous series "Apex Predator" envisions a fantastical twist in the history of evolution. The artists glued individual teeth from dentures on to various types of footwear to create menacing-looking shoes with a bite. Stacked in rows like sharks' teeth, the dentures give the shoes menacing grins that warn one not to get to close.

London artist duo Mariana Fantich and Dominic Young, collectively known as Fantich & Young, create innovative sculptures using found objects. Fantich & Young’s humorous series “Apex Predator” envisions a fantastical twist in the history of evolution. The artists glued individual teeth from dentures on to various types of footwear to create menacing-looking shoes with a bite. Stacked in rows like sharks’ teeth, the dentures give the shoes menacing grins that warn one not to get to close.

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