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Opening Night: Soey Milk and Joey Remmers at CHG Circa

Artists Soey Milk and Joey Remmers were on hand to celebrate their side by side openings at CHG Circa on Saturday. Newly graduated from Pasadena Art Center, Soey Milk was in especially high spirits- her paintings are the culmination of an "unhurried journey" to becoming a fulltime artist. Her solo exhibition "Sinavro" (previewed here) embodies focus and uncertainty that any budding artist might experience. Milk's brush tells us her story, as rocky as her impressionistic strokes which meet points of detail. Her women appear strong and confident in their boldy colored robes, decorated with traditional Korean motifs. Underneath, hints of nudity add an element of carefreeness and mystery that tempt the viewer.

Artists Soey Milk and Joey Remmers were on hand to celebrate their side by side openings at CHG Circa on Saturday. Newly graduated from Pasadena Art Center, Soey Milk was in especially high spirits- her paintings are the culmination of an “unhurried journey” to becoming a fulltime artist. Her solo exhibition “Sinavro” (previewed here) embodies focus and uncertainty that any budding artist might experience. Milk’s brush tells us her story, as rocky as her impressionistic strokes which meet points of detail. Her women appear strong and confident in their boldy colored robes, decorated with traditional Korean motifs. Underneath, hints of nudity add an element of carefreeness and mystery that tempt the viewer.

An air of mystery is also felt in Joey Remmers’ “The Lost” (previewed here). At the reception, he shared with us his interest in the storytelling process and allowing the viewer to put the pieces together. A lover of reading and film, his art posesses a certain Hitchcock-ian vibe, who pinioneered techniques in the suspense and thriller genre. Remmers took inspiration from the horror stories of Japan’s haunted Aokigahara Forest. At first guided by animals like wolves, his female subjects eventually lose themselves in this cold environment. His titles seem to hint to their demise, but the point is to find oneself adrift somwhere in the middle.

“Sinavro” by Soey Milk and “The Lost” by Joey Remmers are now on view at CHG Circa through January 10, 2014.


Soey Milk with her work at the opening reception of “Sinavro.”


Joey Remmers with his work at the opening reception of “The Lost.”

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