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The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Carl Beazley’s Surreal Portraits Have Fun with Facial Expressions

The people in Carl Beazley's portraits seem to be fighting internal battles to hold back their grimaces and make straight faces. His oil paintings feature young people wearing multiple expressions at once. Several small faces inhabit their full-sized heads, each one sending a conflicting signal. Some of Beazley's portraits look like a time lapse of a single gesture, while others are meant to confuse and amuse viewers with their incongruities.

The people in Carl Beazley’s portraits seem to be fighting internal battles to hold back their grimaces and make straight faces. His oil paintings feature young people wearing multiple expressions at once. Several small faces inhabit their full-sized heads, each one sending a conflicting signal. Some of Beazley’s portraits look like a time lapse of a single gesture, while others are meant to confuse and amuse viewers with their incongruities.

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