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Zhang Jingna’s Photographs of Fairytale-esque Beauties

The women in Zhang Jingna's photographs look so pristine that at a first glance, they appear painted. The New York-based artist styles them in flowing, ruffled gowns and adorns them with flowers and jewels.

The women in Zhang Jingna’s photographs look so pristine that at a first glance, they appear painted. The New York-based artist styles them in flowing, ruffled gowns and adorns them with flowers and jewels.

Her models pose in ways that evoke classic female characters from different eras. One woman lies with flowers scattered about her like Shakespeare’s Ophelia did as she drowned in the river. Another evokes a Catholic saint, poised, long-necked, and dressed in white with a thin halo framing her head. Zhang’s characters languish in a romanticized melancholia that adds enigma to their physical beauty.

Zhang is currently featured in the group show “Your Favorite Artist’s Favorite Artist,” on view at Joshua Liner Gallery through December 20.

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