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Slava Fokk’s Stylized Paintings of Women

Moscow-based artist Slava Fokk paints flat, exaggerated figures that evoke vintage advertisements and Art Nouveau alike. His work is imbued with burgundy, teal, and beige color schemes that give it a retro feel. Female characters populate his stylized world. Fokk zeroes in on select details like the contours of the cheek bones and eyelids while making the hair and body abstract. His sleek brushwork gives his characters an otherworldly appearance.

Moscow-based artist Slava Fokk paints flat, exaggerated figures that evoke vintage advertisements and Art Nouveau alike. His work is imbued with burgundy, teal, and beige color schemes that give it a retro feel. Female characters populate his stylized world. Fokk zeroes in on select details like the contours of the cheek bones and eyelids while making the hair and body abstract. His sleek brushwork gives his characters an otherworldly appearance.

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